Research

PhD Dissertation

Title: “A realistic interpretivist approach to childlikeness in consumer research : neoteny, play, reality, and the reterritorializing adulthood
Jury: Prof. Russell W. Belk, Prof. Denis Darpy, Prof. Lisa Peñaloza; Prof. Elyette Roux (supervisor), and Prof. Bertrand Urien.

 

Publications

Alemany Oliver, M. (2017 – forthcoming), “Generation M: Young Muslims Changing the World,” book review, European Journal of Marketing.


Alemany Oliver, M. (2017 – forthcoming), “L’enfant intérieur, un concept marketing universel? Exploration du concept aux Etats-Unis et en France,” Management International.

Abstract: At a time when American and European brands communicate on childlike behavior in adult consumers, this paper explores the inner child concept through an ethnography of cosplay conducted in the US and France. Findings reveal a certain degree of homogeneity between American and French behaviors. We therefore suggest that companies who do business in these countries consider the critical role of play during consumption experiences and more particularly consumers’ preference for disorganized and spontaneous play.

Résumé: Alors que certaines marques américaines et européennes communiquent sur le comportement enfantin du consommateur adulte et que la société de consommation prend quelquefois l’aspect d’un immense terrain de jeu, ce papier explore le concept d’enfant intérieur à travers une ethnographie du cosplay menée aux Etats-Unis et en France. Les résultats montrent une certaine homogénéité des comportements américains et français. Dès lors nous proposons aux entreprises présentes dans ces pays de prendre en compte l’importance du jeu dans l’expérience de consommation et plus particulièrement la préférence des consommateurs pour le jeu désorganisé et spontané.

Resumen: En un momento en que las marcas estadounidenses y francesas valoran el comportamiento infantil en consumidores adultos y que la sociedad de consumo parece como un gran patio de recreo, este trabajo explora el concepto del niño interior mediante una etnografía realizada en los Estados Unidos y Francia. Las conclusiones de esta investigación muestran  un cierto grado de homogeneidad entre los comportamientos estadounidenses y franceses. Por consiguiente, sugerimos a las empresas cuya actividad se desarrolla en estos países que tomen en consideración el papel fundamental del juego durante la experiencia de consumo y,  más específicamente, la preferencia de los consumidores por el juego desordenado y espontáneo.


Alemany Oliver, M. (2016), “Consumer Neoteny: An Evolutionary Perspective on Childlike Behavior in Consumer Society,” Evolutionary Psychology, 14 (3), 1-11.

Abstract: This research explores childlike consumer behavior from an evolutionary perspective. More specifically, it uses the concept of neoteny to show that the retention of ancestors’ juvenile characteristics is related to specific behaviors. The results of factor analyses conducted on a UK sample (n=499) and a French sample (n=292) 7 years later indicate four dimensions of childlike consumer behavior, namely, stimulus seeking, reality conflict,  escapism, and control of aggression.


Alemany Oliver, M., and Vayre, J-S. (2015), “Big Data and the Future of Knowledge Production in Marketing Research: Ethics, Digital Traces, and Abductive Reasoning,” Journal of Marketing Analytics, 3 (March), 5-13.

Abstract: If Big Data has been widely discussed, only a few marketing  researchers have actually paid attention to it. However the development of Big Data, even in the abstract, provides researchers with the opportunity to rethink our approach to gathering and applying knowledge. Many countries, companies and universities are investing millions of dollars in the  development of Big Data. Some believe this era of data driven computational social science has the same potential as the emergence of cognitive science in the 1960s and should not be left to private companies or government agencies. Given the entrance of Big Data techniques to companies and the university setting, it is our role, as consumer researchers, to identify issues that are relevant to our field and to suggest a consumer research method adapted to Big Data. The first section of this article addresses ethical and epistemic issues to consider when conducting marketing research with Big Data. The second section suggests the use of abductive reasoning as a first step in the research process in order to bring context to consumers’ digital traces and make new theories emerge. Finally, we present the archetype-based analysis as an example of what researchers can do with Big Data when they adopt abductive, inductive and deductive approaches in the research process.


Alemany Oliver, M. (2015), “Rejuvenated Territories of Adulthood,” in NA – Advances in Consumer Research Volume 43, ed. Kristin Diehl and Carolyn Yoon, Duluth, MN: Association for Consumer Research, 654-55.


Alemany Oliver, M. (2015), “Is Play the Work of Consumers? The Inner Child’s Influence on Adult Consumers,” in AMA Educators Proceedings Volume 26, ed. Tom Brown and Vanitha Swaminathan, Chicago, IL: American Marketing Association, C-29.


Alemany Oliver, M., and Vayre, J-S. (2015), “Is ‘The Bigger the Better’ Always True? Big Data and Knowledge Production in Marketing,” in AMA Educators Proceedings Volume 26, ed. Tom Brown and Vanitha Swaminathan, Chicago, IL: American Marketing Association, C-17.


Alemany Oliver, M. (2013), “‘Wait…Was I Supposed to Grow Up?’ Consumers’ Adventures in Wonderland,” in NA – Advances in Consumer Research Volume 41, ed. Simona Botti, and Aparna Labroo, Duluth, MN: Association for Consumer Research, 441-42.

Conferences

Alemany Oliver, M. (2017), “Consumer-Brand Relationships in Conspiratorial Narratives,” Association for Consumer Research North American Conference (ACR), San Diego, CA, October 26-29.


Alemany Oliver, M. (2017), “Consumer-Brand Relationships in Conspiratorial Digital Narratives,” GSOM Emerging Markets Conference, St Petersburg, Russia, October 5-7.


Alemany Oliver, M. (2016), “An Exploration of the Neotenous Characteristics of Childlike Consumer Behavior,” Society for Marketing Advances Annual Conference (SMA), Atlanta, GA, November 2-5.


Alemany Oliver, M. (2015), “Rejuvenated Territories of Adulthood,” Association for Consumer Research North American Conference (ACR), New-Orleans, LA, October 1-4.


Alemany Oliver, M., Venkatesh, A., & Roux E. (2015), “Redefining Adulthood in Consumer Research,” 8th Workshop on Interpretive Consumer Research, Edinburgh, UK, April 16-17.


Alemany Oliver, M. (2015), “Is Play the Work of Consumers? The Inner Child’s Influence on Adult Consumers,” American Marketing Association Winter Educator’s Conference (AMA), San Antonio, TX, February 13-15. (Awarded by the AMA and the Sheth Foundation).


Alemany Oliver, M., & Vayre, J-S. (2015), “Is ‘The Bigger the Better’ Always True? Big Data and Knowledge Production in Marketing,” American Marketing Association Winter Educator’s Conference (AMA), San Antonio, TX, February 13-15.


Alemany Oliver, M. (2014), “A Tale of Two Faces: A Story of the Inner Child’s Influence on Adult Consumer Behavior ,” 5th International Research Meeting in Business and Management, Nice, France, July 7-8.


Alemany Oliver, M. (2014), “Behind the Mask: The Inner Child’s Influence on the Construction of a Fantasy Map–or How Consumption Makes Cosplayers Give up any Search for the Territory,” Consumer Culture Theory Conference (CCT), Helsinki, Finland, June 26-29.


Alemany Oliver, M., & Roux, E. (2013), “Il Etait une Fois… L’Avènement de l’Homo Puer dans la Société de Consommation Postmoderne, ” 12èmes Journées Normandes de Recherche sur la Consommation (JNRC), Caen, France, November 28-29.


Alemany Oliver, M. (2013), “‘Wait…Was I Supposed to Grow Up?’ Consumers’ Adventures in Wonderland,” Association for Consumer Research North American Conference (ACR), Chicago, IL, October 3-6.


Alemany Oliver, M., Cambefort, M., Khenfer, J., & Nicod, L. (2012), “La Consommation Postmoderne et ses Paradoxes, ” Les Rencontres du Cercle des Economistes, Aix-en-Provence, France, July 6-8.